at the CNIC

Category: Publications (Page 1 of 10)

Conventional type 1 dendritic cells protect against age-related adipose tissue dysfunction and obesity

Elena Hernández-García, Francisco J. Cueto, Emma C. L. Cook, Ana Redondo-Urzainqui, Sara Charro-Zanca, Iñaki Robles-Vera, Ruth Conde-Garrosa, Ivana Nikolić, Guadalupe Sabio, David Sancho & Salvador Iborra.

Conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) scan and integrate environmental cues in almost every tissue, including exogenous metabolic signals. While cDCs are critical in maintaining immune balance, their role in preserving energy homeostasis is unclear.

Body composition by MRI.

Here, we showed that Batf3-deficient mice lacking conventional type 1 DCs (cDC1s) had increased body weight and adiposity during aging. This led to impaired energy expenditure and glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and liver steatosis. cDC1 deficiency caused adipose tissue inflammation that was preceded by a paucity of NK1.1+ invariant NKT (iNKT) cells. Accordingly, among antigen-presenting cells, cDC1s exhibited notable induction of IFN-γ production by iNKT cells, which plays a metabolically protective role in lean adipose tissue. Flt3L treatment, which expands the dendritic cell (DC) compartment, mitigated diet-induced obesity and hyperlipidemia in a Batf3-dependent manner. This effect was partially mediated by NK1.1+ cells.

These results reveal a new critical role for the cDC1-iNKT cell axis in the regulation of adipose tissue homeostasis.

p38γ and p38δ regulate postnatal cardiac metabolism through glycogen synthase 1

Ayelén M. Santamans, Valle Montalvo-Romeral, Alfonso Mora, Juan Antonio Lopez, Francisco González-Romero, Daniel Jimenez-Blasco, Elena Rodríguez, Aránzazu Pintor-Chocano, Cristina Casanueva-Benítez, Rebeca Acín-Pérez, Luis Leiva-Vega, Jordi Duran, Joan J. Guinovart, Jesús Jiménez-Borreguero, José Antonio Enríquez, María Villlalba-Orero, Juan P. Bolaños, Patricia Aspichueta, Jesús Vázquez, Bárbara González-Terán, Guadalupe Sabio.

During the first weeks of postnatal heart development, cardiomyocytes undergo a major adaptive metabolic shift from glycolytic energy production to fatty acid oxidation. This metabolic change is contemporaneous to the up-regulation and activation of the p38γ and p38δ stress-activated protein kinases in the heart.

Cardiac fibrosis (Image: Ayelén Santamans/CNIC).

We demonstrate that p38γ/δ contribute to the early postnatal cardiac metabolic switch through inhibitory phosphorylation of glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) and glycogen metabolism inactivation. Premature induction of p38γ/δ activation in cardiomyocytes of newborn mice results in an early GYS1 phosphorylation and inhibition of cardiac glycogen production, triggering an early metabolic shift that induces a deficit in cardiomyocyte fuel supply, leading to whole-body metabolic deregulation and maladaptive cardiac pathogenesis. Notably, the adverse effects of forced premature cardiac p38γ/δ activation in neonate mice are prevented by maternal diet supplementation of fatty acids during pregnancy and lactation.

These results suggest that diet interventions have a potential for treating human cardiac genetic diseases that affect heart metabolism.

Resident macrophage-dependent immune cell scaffolds drive anti-bacterial defense in the peritoneal cavity

Adrián Vega-Pérez, Laura H. Villarrubia, Cristina Godio, Alejandra Gutiérrez-González, Lidia Feo-Lucas, Margarita Ferriz, Natalia Martínez-Puente, Julieta Alcaín, Alfonso Mora, Guadalupe Sabio, María López-Bravo, Carlos Ardavín.

Peritoneal immune cells reside unanchored within the peritoneal fluid in homeostasis. Here, we examined the mechanisms that control bacterial infection in the peritoneum using a mouse model of abdominal sepsis following intraperitoneal Escherichia coli infection.

Whole-mount immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy of the peritoneal wall and omentum revealed that large peritoneal macrophages (LPMs) rapidly cleared bacteria and adhered to the mesothelium, forming multilayered cellular aggregates composed by sequentially recruited LPMs, B1 cells, neutrophils, and monocyte-derived cells (moCs). The formation of resident macrophage aggregates (resMφ-aggregates) required LPMs and thrombin-dependent fibrin polymerization. E. coli infection triggered LPM pyroptosis and release of inflammatory mediators. Resolution of these potentially inflammatory aggregates required LPM-mediated recruitment of moCs, which were essential for fibrinolysis-mediated resMφ-aggregate disaggregation and the prevention of peritoneal overt inflammation.

Thus, resMφ-aggregates provide a physical scaffold that enables the efficient control of peritoneal infection, with implications for antimicrobial immunity in other body cavities, such as the pleural cavity or brain ventricles

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